Author Archives: Chicago Film Society

Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man): Warren Beatty’s Delirious Dick Tracy in 35mm – Music Box, Nov. 27

Music Box Theatre – 3733 N. Southport Ave.
General Admission: $7 • High Roller: $10

Monday, Nov 27 @ 7:00PM
DICK TRACY
Directed by Warren Beatty • 1990
If Beetlejuice can step into the cap and cowl of the Dark Knight, why can’t John Reed play Chester Gould’s comic strip crime-stopper? A long-gestating project (Alain Resnais was briefly attached to direct) that finally hit theaters after Tim Burton’s Batman had fatally altered the blockbuster paradigm, Dick Tracy was the first film to gross $100 million and still be judged a flop. Revisited today, it’s a romantic, auteur-driven take on the comic book movie, and the road not traveled for an increasingly bottom-line-obsessed genre. While Marvel and DC efforts are forever teasing the next chapter in their cinematic universes, Dick Tracy crams in so many incidents and villains (Itchy! 88 Keys! The Rodent! Flattop! Pruneface! Dustin Hoffman as Mumbles! Al Pacino, an Oscar nominee, as Big Boy Caprice!) as to make a sequel unfathomable and mildly nausea-inducing. And no subsequent comic book movie has been as invested in working within the parameters of its four-color source material, faithfully recreated and deliriously explored through Richard Sylbert’s production design and Vittorio Storaro’s cinematography. For all the pyrotechnics, though, it’s mostly an emotionally direct, stirringly simple movie about Dick Tracy fitfully trying to be a better boyfriend. With songs by Stephen Sondheim, singing by Madonna, and spittle-flecked mugging from everyone else. (KW)
105 min • Touchstone Pictures • 35mm from Chicago Film Society collections, permission Swank

Preceded by: Roger Rabbit in “Roller Coaster Rabbit” (Frank Marshall and Rob Minkoff, 1990) – 35mm – 7 min

—-

But that’s not all!

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Wednesday, November 29 @ 7:30 PM
IT’S GREAT TO BE ALIVE
Directed by Alfred Werker • 1933
45th Anniversary of the Memory Club with an Appearance from Chuck Schaden
A musical remake of The Last Man on Earth produced during the lascivious pre-Code era, It’s Great To Be Alive hardly stints on the racy implications of its premise. Brazilian crooner Raul Roulien stars as the last surviving XY specimen, a dashing aviator who accidentally missed the masculinitis epidemic by pouting the years away on a remote island after being teased once too often by gal pal Gloria Stuart. And his discovery couldn’t come at a better time—Edna May Oliver’s efforts to create a Synthetic Man in her laboratory have run aground. After treating Roulien to a ticker-tape parade, the women of the world compete for his affections through a dance showcase. Cuba, Czechoslovakia, and the Netherlands—show us what you’ve got! One of a seemingly endless roster of neglected Fox musicals, It’s Great To Be Alive features a handful of numbers from forgotten composer William Kernell, including “I’ll Build a Nest” and “Good Bye, Ladies.” Fox had hoped to build up Roulien as a major star, but alas, his third-billed role in RKO’s Flying Down to Rio later that year hardly helped; his planned breakthrough was overshadowed by fourth- and fifth-billed Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire. Though his career in movies proved too short, Roulien himself never fell victim to masculinitis: he lived to be 94! Preserved by The Museum of Modern Art with support from the Celeste Bartos Fund for Film Preservation.(KW)
69 min • Fox Film Corp • 35mm from the Museum of Modern Art, permission Criterion Pictures
Preceded by: “Any Little Girl That’s a Nice Little Girl” (Fleischer Studios, 1931) – 16mm – 7 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man): Warren Beatty’s Delirious Dick Tracy in 35mm – Music Box, Nov. 27

Celebrate Thanksgiving with a Forgotten (& Fictionalized) Slice of American History: Anthony Mann’s 19th Century Railroad Noir The Tall Target – 35mm Screening, Nov. 22

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Wednesday, November 22 @ 7:30 PM
THE TALL TARGET
Directed by Anthony Mann • 1951
Based on the Baltimore Plot, an alleged attempt to assassinate President Lincoln days before his inauguration, The Tall Target stars Dick Powell as New York policeman John Kennedy (no relation, really!), who learns of the threat on Lincoln’s life and goes vigilante to save the president-elect on board a train full of Yankees and Rebels traveling on the Night Express from Jersey City to Washington. Eschewing any musical score (unless you count the screeches and wails of the train careening through the night), Anthony Mann creates one of the tensest political thrillers ever, despite the inevitability that the Tall Target won’t die this time. A modest financial failure on its initial release, The Tall Target presents a perennially relevant microcosm of Americans against Americans. With wiley Adolphe Menjou as the very corrupt Colonel Caleb Jeffers, Marshall Thompson as a pistol-slinging Confederate, and Ruby Dee in one of her earliest roles. (JA)
78 min • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer • 35mm from Warner Bros.
Preceded by: “Porky’s Railroad” (Frank Tashlin, 1937) – 16mm – 7 min

—-

Last month we had to cancel our screening of Monte Carlo due to a shipping error. It has now been re-scheduled for Monday, December 11 at 7:30PM at NEIU. Mark your calendars!

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Monday, December 11 @ 7:30 PM
MONTE CARLO: THE SILENT VERSION
Directed by Ernst Lubitsch • 1930
Live organ accompaniment by Jay Warren
Crack open any film history textbook and you’ll likely find an extended description of a sequence in Monte Carlo: runaway bride Jeanette MacDonald reclines in a train car and belts out “Beyond the Blue Horizon” with the clang of the engine and the whir of the wheels providing the syncopation. When placed beside the mumbly milestones of the very earliest talkies like The Jazz Singer and The Lights of New York, this simple production number in Monte Carlo looked like a quantum leap and pointed the way towards the creative application of sound technology. And yet this musical chestnut was also distributed mute in the waning days of the silent era, offered to theaters that had not yet been wired for sound. The plot—penniless countess MacDonald flees her wedding for Monte Carlo, where she hopes to gamble her way to financial stability but winds up instead with a count (Jack Buchanan) whom she mistakes for a hairdresser—follows the sound version, but clocks in twenty minutes shorter without all the songs. Discovered among reels of nitrate at the Paramount Pictures lot, the silent version of Monte Carlo was one of dozens of films donated to the American Film Institute in 1968 through the efforts of the late archivist David Shepard. (KW)
71 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Library of Congress, permission Universal
Preceded by: Fractured Flickers: “Pilot Episode” (Jay Ward Productions, 1961) – 16mm – 24 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Celebrate Thanksgiving with a Forgotten (& Fictionalized) Slice of American History: Anthony Mann’s 19th Century Railroad Noir The Tall Target – 35mm Screening, Nov. 22

What Fate Awaits The Last Man on Earth? Discover This Hilarious Silent Comedy in a 35mm Print from MoMA – Nov. 11 at the Music Box, Accompanied by Dennis Scott

Music Box Theatre – 3733 N. Southport Ave.
General Admission Tickets – $11 / Senior Tickets – $9 / Music Box Members – $7

Saturday, November 11 @ Noon
THE LAST MAN ON EARTH
Directed by J.G. Blystone • 1924
Live accompaniment by Dennis Scott, Music Box House Organist
Not to be confused with the post-apocalyptic Vincent Price vs. zombies pic adapted from Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend, the silent version of The Last Man on Earth is a work of speculative science fiction super-charged by festering 19th Amendment anxieties. It’s 1954 and the world has been beset by a global pandemic of masculinitis, a disease that mysteriously kills off all men aged fourteen years and older. Eventually one straggler (Earle Foxe) is discovered in the forest, a tree-dwelling Rip Van Winkle utterly unprepared to become a planetary sex symbol. (His childhood crush once taunted him, saying she wouldn’t marry him if he was the last man on earth. Who’s laughing now?) Foxe is soon set upon by female gangsters, female politicians, female scientists, female everything. The climax even comes down to an extended boxing match between the “Senatoresses” from California and Massachusetts! “The girls really amount to very little, except that there are so many of them,” lamented Variety. “In fact the picture is just a super bathing-girl comedy and would prove a great attraction for the average burlesque houses.” Preserved by The Museum of Modern Art with support from The National Film Preservation Foundation (KW)
70 min • Fox Film Corp • 35mm from the Museum of Modern Art, permission Fox
Preceded by: “It’s the Cats” (Fleischer Studios, 1926) – 7 min, 16mm

—-

Last month we had to cancel our screening of Monte Carlo due to a shipping error. It has now been re-scheduled for Monday, December 11 at 7:30PM at NEIU. Mark your calendars!

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Monday, December 11 @ 7:30 PM
MONTE CARLO: THE SILENT VERSION
Directed by Ernst Lubitsch • 1930
Live organ accompaniment by Jay Warren
Crack open any film history textbook and you’ll likely find an extended description of a sequence in Monte Carlo: runaway bride Jeanette MacDonald reclines in a train car and belts out “Beyond the Blue Horizon” with the clang of the engine and the whir of the wheels providing the syncopation. When placed beside the mumbly milestones of the very earliest talkies like The Jazz Singer and The Lights of New York, this simple production number in Monte Carlo looked like a quantum leap and pointed the way towards the creative application of sound technology. And yet this musical chestnut was also distributed mute in the waning days of the silent era, offered to theaters that had not yet been wired for sound. The plot—penniless countess MacDonald flees her wedding for Monte Carlo, where she hopes to gamble her way to financial stability but winds up instead with a count (Jack Buchanan) whom she mistakes for a hairdresser—follows the sound version, but clocks in twenty minutes shorter without all the songs. Discovered among reels of nitrate at the Paramount Pictures lot, the silent version of Monte Carlo was one of dozens of films donated to the American Film Institute in 1968 through the efforts of the late archivist David Shepard. (KW)
71 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Library of Congress, permission Universal
Preceded by: Fractured Flickers: “Pilot Episode” (Jay Ward Productions, 1961) – 16mm – 24 min

 

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on What Fate Awaits The Last Man on Earth? Discover This Hilarious Silent Comedy in a 35mm Print from MoMA – Nov. 11 at the Music Box, Accompanied by Dennis Scott

The Seventh Victim – The Movie That Puts the “Cult” in “Occult” – Archival 35mm Print – Oct. 31 @ 7:30pm

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Tuesday, October 31 @ 7:30 PM
THE SEVENTH VICTIM
Directed by Mark Robson • 1943
\Tasked with heading up RKO’s horror unit from 1942 to 1946, producer and screenwriter Val Lewton was responsible for one of the most extraordinary runs of films to ever come out of classic Hollywood. Given modest budgets, lurid titles, and a running-time cap of 75 minutes by his superiors, Lewton, along with up-and-coming directors Mark Robson, Jacques Tourneur, and Robert Wise, produced a string of bewitching, ethereal masterpieces and developed a house style defined by expressive shadows, pervasive melancholy, somnambulism, and ambient dread. One of Lewton’s crowning achievements, The Seventh Victim broke from horror conventions of its time and found darkness lurking not in the vampires and monsters of the old world but in good ol’ American sham psychoanalytics and success-centered occultism. Having lost contact with her sister Jacqueline (Jean Brooks, emanating fragility), Mary (Kim Hunter in her first screen role) comes to New York City to investigate the mysterious circumstances surrounding Jacqueline’s disappearance and encounters more foreboding darkened passageways and patrician figures of quiet menace than she could’ve possibly bargained for. Deeper, sadder, and more poetic than your typical satanic cult scare picture, The Seventh Victim does what precious few horror films do: preserves its abundant mysteries past its staggering finale. (CW)
71 min • RKO Radio Pictures • 35mm from Library of Congress, permission Swank
Cartoon: “Bimbo’s Initiation” (Fleischer Studios, 1931) – 16mm – 7 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on The Seventh Victim – The Movie That Puts the “Cult” in “Occult” – Archival 35mm Print – Oct. 31 @ 7:30pm

Tonight’s screening of Monte Carlo regretfully CANCELLED

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Tuesday, October 17 @ 7:30 PM
MONTE CARLO: THE SILENT VERSION
Directed by Ernst Lubitsch • 1930
Live organ accompaniment by Jay Warren
Crack open any film history textbook and you’ll likely find an extended description of a sequence in Monte Carlo: runaway bride Jeanette MacDonald reclines in a train car and belts out “Beyond the Blue Horizon” with the clang of the engine and the whir of the wheels providing the syncopation. When placed beside the mumbly milestones of the very earliest talkies like The Jazz Singer and The Lights of New York, this simple production number in Monte Carlo looked like a quantum leap and pointed the way towards the creative application of sound technology. And yet this musical chestnut was also distributed mute in the waning days of the silent era, offered to theaters that had not yet been wired for sound. The plot—penniless countess MacDonald flees her wedding for Monte Carlo, where she hopes to gamble her way to financial stability but winds up instead with a count (Jack Buchanan) whom she mistakes for a hairdresser—follows the sound version, but clocks in twenty minutes shorter without all the songs. Discovered among reels of nitrate at the Paramount Pictures lot, the silent version of Monte Carlo was one of dozens of films donated to the American Film Institute in 1968 through the efforts of the late archivist David Shepard. (KW)
71 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Library of Congress, permission Universal

Preceded by: Fractured Flickers: “Pilot Episode” (Jay Ward Productions, 1961) – 16mm – 24 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Tonight’s screening of Monte Carlo regretfully CANCELLED

A Festering Problem of Our Flawed Society: Larry Peerce’s Groundbreaking One Potato, Two Potato – Oct. 11

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Wednesday, October 11 @ 7:30 PM
ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO
Directed by Larry Peerce • 1964
Frank Richards (Bernie Hamilton) and Julie Cullen (Barbara Barrie) would have “an ordinary, everyday, uncomplicated relationship” — if only Frank weren’t black and Julie white. The backlash to their marriage comes to a head when Joe Cullen, Julie’s ex-husband, sues for custody of their daughter Ellen Mary. Frank and Julie chose to create a loving home together, but no matter how good they are to each other and to Ellen Mary, a deadbeat who walked out on his wife and child can still assert the prerogative of white male control and decide if that home is ‘acceptable.’ Shot completely on location in Painesville, Ohio, One Potato, Two Potato was the feature debut of Larry Peerce, a Stella Adler protégé who cut his teeth as a TV director in Cincinnati and would later go on to helm the superlative sociological thriller The Incident. One Potato, Two Potato’s unsparing depiction of what a contemporaneous New York Times review called a “festering problem of our flawed society” won the film accolades at home and abroad, including an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay and a Best Actress citation for Barrie at Cannes. As an independent production, One Potato, Two Potato assailed American society’s spitefulness towards racially-mixed families with more honesty and directness than Hollywood’s later and less successful attempt to be interracially woke, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. (JR)
83 min • Bawalco Picture Company • 35mm from Rialto Pictures
Short: “Cicero March” (The Film Group, 1966) – 16mm – 8 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on A Festering Problem of Our Flawed Society: Larry Peerce’s Groundbreaking One Potato, Two Potato – Oct. 11

This is the New Wave cult film your horrible teenage self should have shoplifted from the video store.

Monday, October 9 @ 7:00 PM / Music Box Theatre
SMITHEREENS
Directed by Susan Seidelman • 1982
Susan Seidelman’s feature film debut Smithereens is the meaner, younger sister of her cult classic Desperately Seeking Susan. Released three years prior and funded in part by the money Seidelman’s grandmother left her for her “future wedding,” it was shot without permits on the streets of Koch-era New York City (sorry Grandma) and went on to compete at Cannes. Susan Berman stars as Wren, a New Jersey runaway who heads to NYC seeking fame in the punk scene, and whose limited talents include pasting Xeroxed self-portraits of herself around town and pinballing back and forth between sweet (but decidedly NOT punk) Brad Rinn and sexy (real-life punk icon) Richard Hell. Though its main character may have been a ne’er-do-well who showed up late to the cultural moment party, its creator was anything but. Seidelman, in 1982: “My idea was to capture the crazy energy of the rock clubs, the sleazy bars, the tenement lofts. I wanted to people the film with characters who were products of the mass culture of the 1970’s and 80’s, kids who grew up on rock and roll. The design of the film is strongly influenced by cartoons, pop art and the colorful trashiness of New York’s urban landscape.” With a soundtrack soaked in the Feelies, ESG, and the Voidoids and screening in a newly struck 35mm print, this is the New Wave cult film your horrible teenage self should have shoplifted from the video store. (RL)
89 min • Domestic Productions • 35mm from Westchester Films, Inc.
Film Stock: Kodak 2383 (2016) Lab: Fotokem
Presale tickets available here!

Preceded by: “Punking Out” (Maggi Carson, Juliusz Kossakowski, and Fredric A. Shore, 1979) – 16mm – 25 min
“Punking Out” courtesy of the Reserve Film and Video Collection of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. “Punking Out” has been preserved with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Posted in News | Comments Off on This is the New Wave cult film your horrible teenage self should have shoplifted from the video store.

Celebrate Home Movie Day with CFS and CFA at the Chicago History Museum – Saturday, Oct. 7 from 11 to 3


Saturday, October 7 @ 11:00 AM
HOME MOVIE DAY 2017
Presented by the Chicago Film Society and Chicago Film Archives.
Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark Street • Free Admission
Go down to the basement and dig out your Super 8 memories of that interminable trip to Idaho or that embarrassing 16mm footage of your mother’s rockin’ bat mitzvah and bring them to the Chicago History Museum on Saturday, October 7 for this year’s edition of Home Movie Day. Jointly presented for the seventh year in a row by Chicago Film Archives and the Chicago Film Society, Home Movie Day offers Chicagoans the opportunity to gather together and share their celluloid histories. Home movies provide invaluable records of our families and our communities: they document vanished storefronts, questionable fashions, adorable pets, long-departed loved ones, and neighborhoods-in-transition. Many Chicagoans still possess these old reels, passed down from generation to generation, but lack the projection equipment to view them properly and safely. That’s where Home Movie Day comes in: you bring the films, and we inspect them, project them, and offer tips on storage, preservation, and video transfer–all free of charge. And best of all, you get to watch them with an enthusiastic audience, equally hungry for local history.

—–

And don’t forget to join us again on Monday for a brand new print of Smithereens!

Monday, October 9 @ 7:00 PM / Music Box Theatre
SMITHEREENS
Directed by Susan Seidelman • 1982
Susan Seidelman’s feature film debut Smithereens is the meaner, younger sister of her cult classic Desperately Seeking Susan. Released three years prior and funded in part by the money Seidelman’s grandmother left her for her “future wedding,” it was shot without permits on the streets of Koch-era New York City (sorry Grandma) and went on to compete at Cannes. Susan Berman stars as Wren, a New Jersey runaway who heads to NYC seeking fame in the punk scene, and whose limited talents include pasting Xeroxed self-portraits of herself around town and pinballing back and forth between sweet (but decidedly NOT punk) Brad Rinn and sexy (real-life punk icon) Richard Hell. Though its main character may have been a ne’er-do-well who showed up late to the cultural moment party, its creator was anything but. Seidelman, in 1982: “My idea was to capture the crazy energy of the rock clubs, the sleazy bars, the tenement lofts. I wanted to people the film with characters who were products of the mass culture of the 1970’s and 80’s, kids who grew up on rock and roll. The design of the film is strongly influenced by cartoons, pop art and the colorful trashiness of New York’s urban landscape.” With a soundtrack soaked in the Feelies, ESG, and the Voidoids and screening in a newly struck 35mm print, this is the New Wave cult film your horrible teenage self should have shoplifted from the video store. (RL)
89 min • Domestic Productions • 35mm from Westchester Films, Inc.
Film Stock: Kodak 2383 (2016) Lab: Fotokem
Presale tickets available here!

Preceded by: “Punking Out” (Maggi Carson, Juliusz Kossakowski, and Fredric A. Shore, 1979) – 16mm – 25 min
“Punking Out” courtesy of the Reserve Film and Video Collection of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. “Punking Out” has been preserved with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Celebrate Home Movie Day with CFS and CFA at the Chicago History Museum – Saturday, Oct. 7 from 11 to 3

Jacques Tourneur’s Pacific NorthWestern Canyon Passage
Screens Tuesday, October 3 in 35mm – 7:30 @ NEIU

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Tuesday, October 3 @ 7:30 PM
CANYON PASSAGE
Directed by Jacques Tourneur • 1946
Dana Andrews, his best worst friend (and compulsive gambler) Brian Donlevy, and Susan Hayward star in this bloodcurdling melodrama, set just outside Portland, Oregon, that Eden of the west. Jacques Tourneur’s first color feature is searingly bright, bloody, and vivid, creating a tense, volatile atmosphere well suited to expose the American Myth as a capitalist farce and elegantly weaving multiple storylines and characters. Working across multiple genres throughout his career, Tourneur does for the western what Cat People and I Walked With a Zombie did for the horror film, and the result is nightmarish and deliciously human. Formerly mistaken for one of the many well-intentioned but ultimately humdrum Universal westerns of the ’40s, Canyon Passage has been passionately rescued by the auteurist police, who really got it right this time. The incidental music, courtesy of Hoagy Carmichael, is particularly effective, giving the feeling that you’ve just arrived at a party that’s about to turn into a drunken brawl. With Ward Bond, Lloyd Bridges—and it wouldn’t be a western without Andy Devine. (JA)
92 min • Universal  • 35mm from Universal

Preceded by: Porky Pig in “Wagon Heels” (Robert Clampett, 1945) – 16mm – 7 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on Jacques Tourneur’s Pacific NorthWestern Canyon Passage
Screens Tuesday, October 3 in 35mm – 7:30 @ NEIU

They Don’t Make ‘Em Like This Anymore: Mitchell Leisen’s Colossal Soaper To Each His Own in 35mm – Sept. 27

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Wednesday, September 27 @ 7:30 PM
TO EACH HIS OWN
Directed by Mitchell Leisen • 1946
An epic soap opera that resurrected the maternal melodrama from the postwar doldrums, To Each His Own was a self-conscious throwback, closer to the generation-spanning heartbreak of Stella Dallas than the gunfire parenting of Mildred Pierce. Woman’s pic master  Mitchell Leisen and screenwriter Charles Brackett fashioned To Each His Own to suit the needs of Olivia de Havilland, returning to the screen after two years’ absence following a contract dispute with Warner Bros. The gambit paid off: de Havilland won a Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of Jody Norris, a young woman who works in her family’s pharmacy and becomes impregnated by a suave pilot (John Lund) towards the end of World War I. After her lover’s death, Jody arranges for their son to be adopted but remains his protector from afar, securing young Griggsy’s future from her burgeoning cosmetics empire but never managing to buy the boy’s love. Will the grown-up Griggsy (Lund again!) ever appreciate or understand his mysterious benefactor? We can’t say, but we’ll pass along Leisen’s paraphrase of a plea from exhibitors: “Please add a little bit on the end to let people dry their tears. We turn on our lights and the customers are crying so hard they can’t see their way out of the theater.” (KW)
122 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Universal

Preceded by: Popeye the Sailor in “I Likes Babies and Infinks” (Fleischer Studios, 1937) – 16mm – 7 min

And check out the rest of the season here.

Posted in News | Comments Off on They Don’t Make ‘Em Like This Anymore: Mitchell Leisen’s Colossal Soaper To Each His Own in 35mm – Sept. 27