Monthly Archives: August 2016

Colbert and Marshall Together in George Cukor’s Ultra-Rare Zaza in 35mm – Never Released on Home Video

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

12 Zaza 600

Wednesday, August 31 @ 7:30 PM
ZAZA
Directed by George Cukor • 1939
A classic tale of love and heartbreak gets reworked by the steady directorial hand of George Cukor (of Gaslight and My Fair Lady fame). Directing a story told time and again for the stage, screen, and even the opera, Cukor steered  away  from  what  he considered the  “terribly  French  endless exploration of unfaithfulness and the suffering of love” and focused instead on recreating the rich and bustling world of the cabaret with Zaza (played by Claudette Colbert) at its center. The Zaza of 1939 casts off its sentimental origins to become the story of a woman trying desperately to maintain the delicate balance of life onstage and off. When Zaza begins an affair with a married man (Herbert Marshall), the ensuing turmoil threatens to bring it all crashing down. A fresh take on an old tale, and a chance to catch two familiar actors doing unfamiliar things, with Colbert doing her own singing and dancing, and Bert “The Cowardly Lion” Lahr in a rare dramatic role. (RL)
83 min • Paramount Pictures  • 35mm from Universal
Film Stock: Kodak (B+W Acetate) 1997
Preceded by: Bert Lahr in “No More West” (Nick Grinde, 1934) – 16mm – 20 min

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Brando and Nicholson – The Screen’s Greatest Couple Together in 35mm in Arthur Penn’s The Missouri Breaks

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

11 Missouri Breaks 600

Wednesday, August 24 @ 7:30 PM
THE MISSOURI BREAKS
Directed by Arthur Penn • 1976
Time has been kind to The Missouri Breaks. Considered a commercial and critical flop upon its release, perhaps our eyes are now clear of the anticipation haze that came with the first (and only) pairing of two of Hollywood’s favorite sons. After losing a gang member to hanging, horse rustler Tom Logan (Jack Nicholson) settles down to play farmer and neighbor to rancher David Braxton (John McLiam), soon beginning an unintended affair with Braxton’s daughter (Kathleen Lloyd). The two are stalked by a sociopathic regulator (an erratic but completely mesmerizing Marlon Brando), resulting in some of the most believable representations of “looking through binoculars” in the history of film. Forty years after its release, as the screeching of the buzzards circling Brando’s later career have died down, it’s time to see this film anew. A simultaneously stoned and savage Western tale; a strange dance of death where no one is right and everyone loses. Peppered with standout interludes by the likes of Harry Dean Stanton, Randy Quaid, and Frederic Forrest as Logan’s crew of loveable losers. (RL)
126 min • United Artists • 35mm from Park Circus
Film Stock: Kodak 2383 (2005)
Preceded by: Cartoon TBA

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A bout de souffle … Made in USA: Jim McBride’s Gonzo Breathless – 35mm Screening with the Power Cosmic

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

10 Breathless 600

Wednesday, August 17 @ 7:30 PM
BREATHLESS
Directed by Jim McBride • 1983
“Hey, where’d you get those pants? What are you trying to do—disguise yourself as an asshole? How many times have I told you that style counts?” That’s the central lesson of Jim McBride and L.M. Kit Carson’s unequivocally gonzo SoCal reimagining of the 1960 nouvelle vague classic. Like the bastard love child and/or hell spawn of Jean-Luc Godard and Jerry Lee Lewis, the ’83 Breathless translates the transgressions of the original version to the decadent vernacular of its glam-addled moment. Richard Gere replaces Jean-Paul Belmondo as the dumb lug cop-killer and assays a ridiculous and riotous masculine energy. He gives 110% and plays the part like a horny Speedy Gonzales, forever hopped up on Ding Dongs and Silver Surfer comics. Valérie Kaprisky takes the thankless Jean Seberg part and plays Gere’s wiser, grounded girlfriend with unassuming gusto. (Luckily, with Godard out of the picture, the misogyny is dialed down considerably.) The soundtrack tells the tale: the sock hop pop melodies of Sam Cooke and The Pretenders gradually give way to X and Eno, signaling the dawn of another New Wave. (KW)
100 min • Orion Pictures • 35mm from Park Circus

Preceded by: “Miss Universe 1983” – 35mm – 16 min

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