Monthly Archives: November 2015

Best of the West: Edward G. Robinson in Howard Hawks’s Tiger Shark – New 35mm Library of Congress Print

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

10_Tiger Shark_600

Wednesday, December 9 @ 7:00 PM
TIGER SHARK
Directed by Howard Hawks • 1932
Edward G. Robinson may play a tuna fisherman (the best in the Pacific Ocean, he reminds us nine or ten times), but the only thing he manages to nibble around here is the scenery. Robinson’s Mike Mascarenas is a singular force in San Diego’s Portuguese immigrant community, strutting around like a manicured, semi-literate Captain Hook with a gypsy earring, or perhaps a burlesque Ahab. A hard-headed man’s man who values loyalty above all, Mascarenas enters uncharted waters as a clandestine romance brews between his wife (Zita Johann) and his best friend (Richard Arlen). Celebrated today for its viscerally unsafe fishing sequences and its quintessentially Hawksian maleness, Tiger Shark was initially embraced by its studio as a peerless template for exploring the terror of working class life; Warner Bros. unofficially repurposed the storyline twice within the next decade, translating the love triangle to the world of circus wranglers (Bengal Tiger) and electrical linemen (Manpower). (KW)
77 min • Warner Bros. • 35mm from the Library of Congress

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Four Score and Seven Laughs Ago: Leo McCarey’s Immortal Comedy Ruggles of Red Gap in 35mm

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

Wednesday, November 25 @ 7:00 PM
RUGGLES OF RED GAP
Directed by Leo McCarey • 1935
Butler Marmaduke Ruggles (Charles Laughton) is an Englishman in Red Gap, Washington when his master loses him in a gentleman’s bet to American millionaires Effie and Egbert Floud (Mary Boland and Charlie Ruggles, no relation). A capsule of British-American relations in the same vein as Powell & Pressburger’s A Canterbury Tale and A Matter of Life and Death, Ruggles of Red Gap is genuinely, whimsically patriotic while ribbing slack-jawed Americans for the film’s duration. Laughton orchestrated the production of his first comedy, choosing the source material (Harry Leon Wilson’s 1915 novel, filmed previously in 1918 and 1923, and one last time in 1950 as Fancy Pants with Bob Hope) and Leo McCarey as the director, and often cited the performance as his favorite role. The climax, Laughton’s recitation of the Gettysburg Address, is one of the most fluid and engaging sequences in all of cinema, yet amidst the intoxicating madness of Ruggles of Red Gap, it’s only a footnote. With Zasu Pitts and Roland Young. (JA)
91 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Universal

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