Monthly Archives: August 2015

New Season, New Trauma:
Alfred Hitchcock’s Marnie in 35mm IB Technicolor

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

01_Marnie_600

Wednesday, September 2nd @ 7:00 PM
MARNIE
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock • 1964
How did Marnie (Tippi Hedren), the frigid typist, develop a compulsion for stealing? Why does her boss (Sean Connery) blackmail her into marriage­? What traumas lie inside Marnie’s childhood home on the fringes of Baltimore? A psychoanalytic case history structured like a conjugal detective adventure and decorously promoted as “Hitchcock’s Suspenseful Sex Mystery,” Marnie literalizes the return of the repressed. Initially dismissed as a technically incompetent relic brought down from the attic of once-fashionable high Freudianism, Marnie was quickly rehabilitated by auteurists, feminists, and Hitchcock fanciers as a conflicted confession from the inner sanctum of the patriarchy. (Significantly, Hitchcock commissioned the final script from neophyte Jay Presson Allen after his usual collaborators proved unwilling and unable to deliver a scene depicting marital rape, making Marnie that rare Hollywood examination of sexual conquest that actually happens to be written by a woman.)  Seen in an original IB Technicolor print, it’s also an aesthetic wonder—a precisely calibrated cinema machine that periodically breaks down in a hysterical miasma of red light.  (KW)
130 min • Universal Pictures • 35mm IB Technicolor from private collections

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Alfred Hitchcock’s Marnie in 35mm IB Technicolor

Rotten Apples, Rotten Souls: Anthony Mann’s
Technicolor Western Bend of the River in 35mm

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2
Bend

Wednesday, August 26 @ 7:00pm
BEND OF THE RIVER
Directed by Anthony Mann • 1952
The second of eight collaborations between sullen tragedian Anthony Mann and sunny megastar James Stewart, Bend of the River makes for one tense and contradictory Western: visually expansive and emotionally boxed-in, Sunday school morality posed against confiscatory capitalism. Stewart stars as Glyn McClyntock, a reformed border raider who still has the rope marks across his neck to prove it. Like innumerable William S. Hart characters, McClyntock glimpses redemption just across the mountain pass, in the arms of a good woman (Julia Adams). Problem is, her father (Jay C. Flippen) is convinced that rotten apples can’t be saved, only discarded before they contaminate the whole civilized barrel. Arthur Kennedy co-stars as Stewart’s romantic rival, another reformed gunslinger who pushes the Apple Doctrine to its limit. The staggering location photography—fertile hills, snowy peaks, and, yes, a climactic bend of the river—mixes ably with a studio evocation of Portland as a vanished riverfront trading post. There’s plenty of action, but the real violence lies inside. (KW)
92 min • Universal-International • 35mm from Universal

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Technicolor Western Bend of the River in 35mm

I’ll See You in My Dreams …
Bill Forsyth’s Housekeeping in 35mm

The Auditorium at Northeastern Illinois University – Building E, 3701 W. Bryn Mawr Ave
General Admission: $5 • NEIU Students: $2

HOUSEKEEPNG-CTIT-414Wednesday, August 12 @ 7:00pm
HOUSEKEEPING
Directed by Bill Forsyth • 1987
Marilynne Robinson’s 1980 debut novel Housekeeping receives a sterling and reverent adaptation from Scottish filmmaker Bill Forsyth. A thoroughly self-effacing artist, Forsyth is not shy about telling audiences to read the book instead, but it’s no either/or proposition. Set in a Pacific Northwest hamlet derived from Robinson’s childhood memories, Housekeeping explores the interconnected weight of memory, family, and conformity through a feminist prism. Following their mother’s suicide, orphaned sisters Ruthie (Sara Walker) and Lucille (Andrea Burchill) are shuffled from one impromptu guardian to another until winding up with their aunt Sylvie (a superlative Christine Lahti). A frizzly, live-wire soul with no stake in the status quo, Sylvie would rather recite train schedules than pretend to keep house. Spying a nascent rebel in Ruthie, Sylvie must spin a new fiction and charter a place in the world. Along with Hope and Glory and The Last Emperor, Housekeeping is an artifact of Columbia’s short-lived art film slate; following the ouster of production chief and Forsyth ally David Puttnam, Housekeeping was left to wander the winds, cluelessly marketed as a wacky comedy.  It stands now as one of the very finest films of the 1980s—brittle, weightless, and mad. (KW)
116 min • Columbia Pictures • 35mm from Sony Pictures Repertory

Introduced by Chicago-based filmmaker Stephen Cone, director of Black Box (2013) and The Wise Kids (2011)

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Bill Forsyth’s Housekeeping in 35mm