Monthly Archives: September 2013

Don’t Go Into the Projection Booth Alone: Hitchcock’s Sabotage Returns to the Big Screen in Suspenseful 35mm

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

Wednesday, October 2 @ 7:30pm
SABOTAGE
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock • 1936
Beginning with the bones of Joseph Conrad’s novel The Secret Agent and re-imagining the material to his own ends, Hitchcock fashions Sabotage into a preternaturally stoic and chilling affair. Conrad’s anarchist anti-hero Verloc was a swarthy foreigner hatching a terror plot from the confines of his lewd general store. In Hitchcock’s version, Verloc (Oscar Homolka) has found an even better cover: he runs a cinema with his wife, Sylvia Sidney. We could tell you all about the ingenious investigation of anti-terrorism agent John Loder and the terrible plot that he cannot unravel in time, but let’s be honest about something: we love this movie primarily because it features Sylvia Sidney selling movie tickets, sweeping up the theater, and watching cartoons—just like us! Underrated in its day but subsequently acclaimed as the summit of Hitchcock’s British period by Dave Kehr and Raymond Durgnat, Sabotage perhaps achieved its greatest visibility in 2009 when Quentin Tarantino lifted a clip to illustrate the perils of nitrate film in Inglourious Basterds. (KW)
77 min • Gaumont British Pictures Corp. • 35mm from Park Circus

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And don’t forget to come back on Friday for a very special screening:

06A GOLDSTEIN

Friday, October 4 @ 7:30pm
GOLDSTEIN
Directed by Philip Kaufman and Benjamin Manaster • 1964
A ragtag, charmingly self-conscious attempt at forging an American nouvelle vague, Goldstein was the first feature of University of Chicago graduate Philip Kaufman. Shot entirely on the streets of Chicago during the fall of 1963, Goldstein offers an invaluable record of apartments, factories, and downtown movie palaces soon buried by urban renewal. The loose storyline follows the audacious adventures of a Hassidic hobo (Lou Gilbert) who emerges from Lake Michigan, but the many digressions include visits with folksy poets, wacky abortionists, novelist Nelson Algren, and Second City veterans Severn Darden, Anthony Holland, and Tom Erhard. A rousing success at the 1964 Cannes Film Festival, where it won La prix de la nouvelle critique, Goldstein reminds us, too, of the perilous fate of many independent productions. With no studio to look after it and the original camera negative long missing, Goldstein has been newly restored from Kaufman’s personal print. Preservation funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. (KW)
Co-presented with Chicago Film Archives
84 min • Montrose Film Productions • 35mm from George Eastman House

CAM 2013 horizontalGoldstein is part of Chicago Artists Month 2013, the 18th annual celebration of Chicago’s vibrant art community presented by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.  For more information, visit www.chicagoartistsmonth.org.

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Tumultuous Tabloid Tonic, Circa 1900:
Jacques Becker’s Casque d’or in 35mm

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

04B CASQUEWednesday, September 25 @ 7:30pm
CASQUE D’OR
Directed by Jacques Becker • 1952
Simone Signoret stars as Marie, a prostitute whose great golden curls supply the film’s title (Casque d’or, or Golden Helmet). She’s the moll of the underachieving gangster Raymond and a lustful fixation for Raymond’s boss, Leca, but Marie really loves Manda (Serge Reggiani), a reformed criminal-turned-carpenter. Naturally, her desires threaten to tear apart the Belle Epoque underworld. Based on an infamous case that dominated French newspapers in 1902 and brought to the screen with a magnificently detailed vision of vice from days gone by, Casque d’or gave French classicism a good, full-blooded name and pointed the way toward a pure and purposeful style for Jean Luc-Godard and François Truffaut. Critic and novelist G. Cabrera Infante has described the film most poetically: “Becker has achieved a faithful portrait of fin de siècle Paris. But on this occasion it was not the amiable brush of the impressionists, but the steely burin of an engraver, describing the Parisian bas-fonds with the sound and fury of a Goya of the banlieux.” In French with English subtitles. (KW)
94 min • Spéva Films • 35mm from Janus Films

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And coming next week: Sylvia Sidney may be down, but she’s not out!

05A SABOTAGE
Wednesday, October 2 @ 7:30pm
SABOTAGE
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock • 1936
Beginning with the bones of Joseph Conrad’s novel The Secret Agent and re-imagining the material to his own ends, Hitchcock fashions Sabotage into a preternaturally stoic and chilling affair. Conrad’s Verloc was a swarthy foreigner hatching an anarchist plot from his lewd general store. In Hitchcock’s version, Verloc (Oscar Homolka) has found an even better cover: he runs a cinema with his wife, Sylvia Sidney. We could tell you all about the ingenious investigation of anti-terrorism agent John Loder and the terrible plot that he cannot unravel in time, but let’s be honest about something: we love this movie primarily because it features Sylvia Sidney selling movie tickets, sweeping up the theater, and watching cartoons—just like us! Underrated in its day but subsequently acclaimed as the summit of Hitchcock’s British period by Dave Kehr and Raymond Durgnat, Sabotage perhaps achieved its greatest visibility in 2009 when Quentin Tarantino lifted a clip to illustrate the perils of nitrate film in Inglourious Basterds. (KW)
77 min • Gaumont British Pictures Corp. • 35mm from Park Circus

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Jacques Becker’s Casque d’or in 35mm

Forgotten Millions, Forgotten No More: Massacre
Returns in a 35mm Print from the Library of Congress

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

03B MASSACREWednesday, September 18 @ 7:30pm
MASSACRE
Directed by Alan Crosland • 1934
Chief Joe Thunderhorse (Richard Barthelmess) has a stable rodeo gig at Chicago’s Century of Progress International Exposition and a parade of women mouthing lewd, pre-Code come-ons, but nothing is a patch on authentic tribal identity. Returning to the Sioux reservation he hasn’t visited in a decade, Thunderhorse discovers an inept kleptocracy run for the benefit of white bureaucrats. Teaming up with plucky, college-educated typist Ann Dvorak, Barthelmess preaches cultural and spiritual autonomy and is promptly labeled a Bolshevik-pagan by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Massacre employs white actors to impart its message, but it applies its pile-driving melodrama to genuinely progressive ends. It decries the costs of assimilation, delivers an apologia for New Deal-style government activism, and strikes an off-handed analogy between the treatment of Native Americans and African Americans. Treating showbiz as a form of ethnic empathy, Massacre also boasts the sharpest direction ever from Jazz Singer helmer Crosland. (KW)
Co-presented with portoluz – New and Old Dreams
70 min • First National • 35mm from the Library of Congress, permission Warner Bros.

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Someone else on the outside looking in …

04A CASQUEWednesday, September 25 @ 7:30pm
CASQUE D’OR
Directed by Jacques Becker • 1952
Simone Signoret stars as Marie, a prostitute whose great golden curls supply the film’s title (Casque d’or, or Golden Helmet). She’s the moll of the underachieving gangster Raymond and a lustful fixation for Raymond’s boss, Leca, but Marie really loves Manda (Serge Reggiani), a reformed criminal-turned-carpenter. Naturally, her desires threaten to tear apart the Belle Epoque underworld. Based on an infamous case that dominated French newspapers in 1902 and brought to the screen with a magnificently detailed vision of vice from days gone by, Casque d’or gave French classicism a good, full-blooded name and pointed the way toward a pure and purposeful style for Jean Luc-Godard and François Truffaut. Critic and novelist G. Cabrera Infante has described the film most poetically: “Becker has achieved a faithful portrait of fin de siècle Paris. But on this occasion it was not the amiable brush of the impressionists, but the steely burin of an engraver, describing the Parisian bas-fonds with the sound and fury of a Goya of the banlieux.” In French with English subtitles. (KW)
94 min • Spéva Films • 35mm from Janus Films

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Returns in a 35mm Print from the Library of Congress

Join Us at the Patio for Malick’s Days of Heaven
Where Every Show is The Magic Hour – New 35mm Print!

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

02B DAYSWednesday, September 11 @ 7:30pm
DAYS OF HEAVEN
Directed by Terrence Malick • 1978
Did any modern classic receive more dismissive and flippant opening day notices than Days of Heaven? David Denby called it “one of the most perversely undramatic, uninvolving, and senseless movies ever made,” and one can almost see what he means. There isn’t much meat to the story and this is perhaps the most silent talkie you will ever see (as is Malick’s way). Nestor Almendros and Haskell Wexler’s magic hour visuals are held together by Linda Manz’s impromptu voiceover narration—a naïve but unconsciously wise reflection on a soured American Dream. Manz, her brother (Richard Gere), and his girlfriend (Brooke Adams) flee Chicago for the Texas panhandle where their fate turns tragic after Adams, in the hope for a better life for them all, marries a wealthy farmer (Sam Shepard). Appointed with sometimes-surreal compositions, a dreamily hopeful score of Ennio Morricone by way of Saint-Säens, and a haunting swarm of locusts, Days of Heaven is now recognized as a singularly beautiful cinematic experience. (HG/KW)
94 min • Paramount • 35mm from Paramount

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And come back next Wednesday for a whole different kind of frontier!

03A MASSACRE
Wednesday, September 18 @ 7:30pm
MASSACRE
Directed by Alan Crosland • 1934
Chief Joe Thunderhorse (Richard Barthelmess) has a stable rodeo gig at Chicago’s Century of Progress International Exposition and a parade of women mouthing lewd, pre-Code come-ons, but nothing is a patch on authentic tribal identity. Returning to the Sioux reservation he hasn’t visited in a decade, Thunderhorse discovers an inept kleptocracy run for the benefit of white bureaucrats. Teaming up with plucky, college-educated typist Ann Dvorak, Barthelmess preaches cultural and spiritual autonomy and is promptly labeled a Bolshevik-pagan by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Massacre employs white actors to impart its message, but it applies its pile-driving melodrama to genuinely progressive ends. It decries the costs of assimilation, delivers an apologia for New Deal-style government activism, and strikes an off-handed analogy between the treatment of Native Americans and African Americans. Treating showbiz as a form of ethnic empathy, Massacre also boasts the sharpest direction ever from Jazz Singer helmer Crosland. (KW)
70 min • First National • 35mm from the Library of Congress, permission Warner Bros.

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Where Every Show is The Magic Hour – New 35mm Print!

The True Story of Tinted Talkies: An Interview with Anthony L’Abbate

ONE HOUR WITH YOU 002Our new season begins on Wednesday with One Hour with You. If you’ve never seen it, you have a wonderful, adult, emotionally resonant musical to look forward to. If you have seen it before—say, on Criterion’s budget-line Eclipse DVD or in a 16mm print at the old LaSalle Bank Cinema—you haven’t really seen it either.

That’s because Universal’s 35mm print is tinted. Derived from a restored negative from UCLA Film and Television Archives, this version doesn’t include any new scenes, but around half of the footage is tinted sepia or lavender. (The remainder of the film is black-and-white.) That makes the print unusual in 2013, but hardly so in 1932. Continue reading

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