Monthly Archives: July 2013

Meet One of the Finest Minds of the 19th Century: Mankiewciz’s The Late George Apley in 35mm

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Raod – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

20A_Apley

Wednesday, 31 July @ 7:30pm
THE LATE GEORGE APLEY
Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz • 1947
With the nineteenth century fading into the twentieth, New York City has supplanted Boston as America’s cultural capital, but don’t tell that to Beacon Hill Brahmin George Apley (Ronald Colman), who valiantly and obtusely upholds the traditions (philosophical, funereal, ornithological) his own family has abandoned. His Freud-quoting daughter Ellie (Gun Crazy femme fatale Peggy Cummins in her American debut) presses George to join the modern world, but old WASPs don’t give up their stingers so easily. A gentle and effortless satire of middle age and evaporating aristocracy taken from Mr. Moto creator John P. Marquand’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1937 novel, the film adaptation benefits from screenwriter (and Harvard alum) Philip Dunne’s intimate familiarity with the milieu and director Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s singular skill in staging sophisticated dialogue. Together with Colman’s Oscar-winning turn in A Double Life released later the same year, The Late George Apley represents the culmination of the actor’s three-decade career. (KW) [PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
97 min • 20th Century-Fox • 35mm from Criterion Pictures, USA

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Forgive our morbid leanings as of late, but do make plans to catch this one:

20B_Dead Man

Monday, August 5 @ 7:30pm
DEAD MAN
Directed by Jim Jarmusch • 1995
Lauded by J. Hoberman as “the western Andrei Tarkovsky always wanted to make,” Dead Man is an ethereal vision quest set against an industrialized, monochrome frontier. Johnny Depp stars as William Blake, a Cleveland accountant cosmically but not biologically related to the English poet and painter. Shortly after his arrival in a mudhole called Machine, Blake finds himself wanted for the murder of a local steel magnate’s daughter and her jealous lover. Hunted by a trio of bounty collectors hired by Robert Mitchum (in his final performance), the wounded Blake stumbles through the landscape with only a laconic Native American named Nobody (Gary Farmer) at his side. An acid recollection on the West’s genocidal golden age anchored in the texture of daily life, Jarmusch’s Dead Man reinvents the genre as something simultaneously grim, elegiac, and wondrous. Unceremoniously dumped by Miramax despite such saleable aspects as Depp’s doe-eyed innocence and Neil Young’s unsettling guitar score, Dead Man has become an underground milestone. (KW)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
121 min • Miramax • 35mm from Park Circus

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Sylvia Sidney: A Lovely Crook for Reforming

Thanks to Neil Cooper for sharing this clipping with us.

Miracle Man_Sidney_Morris

Miracle Man

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The Miracle Man – Ultra-Rare, Devout Gangster Drama with Sylvia Sidney and Boris Karloff – Wednesday, 7:30 – 35mm

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

18B-19A_Miracle ManWednesday, July 24 @ 7:30pm
THE MIRACLE MAN
Directed by Norman Z. McLeod • 1932
A whip-smart gang of New York grifters (Sylvia Sidney, Chester Morris, Ned Sparks, and John Wray) have one sweet swindle going until a fatal clash with lascivious landlord Boris Karloff ruins their plans. Fleeing the cops, Morris hides out in the seaside paradise of Meadville, California, home to a beloved faith healer known universally as the Patriarch (Hobart Bosworth). Sensing the potential for the scam of the century, Morris summons his confederates—but will they still accede to the scheme after the Patriarch makes the crippled walk again? Aside from being a gonzo gangster yarn and a memorable piece of white-hot entertainment in its own right, The Miracle Man holds great interest as a phantom artifact of film history: it’s a remake of an enormously popular 1919 film that has vanished but for a few fragments. The original version gave Lon Chaney a star-making turn as the double-jointed con man known as the Frog; if Chaney was anywhere near as impressive in that role as John Wray comes off in the 1932 rendition, we’ve lost something very special indeed. (KW)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
85 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Universal

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And come back next week for another cinema rarity (do we ever run out?) …

CARTEL ITALIANO - 140x200Wednesday, 31 July @ 7:30pm
THE LATE GEORGE APLEY
Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz • 1947
With the nineteenth century fading into the twentieth, New York City has supplanted Boston as America’s cultural capital, but don’t tell that to Beacon Hill Brahmin George Apley (Ronald Colman), who valiantly and obtusely upholds the traditions (philosophical, funereal, ornithological) his own family has abandoned. His Freud-quoting daughter Ellie (Gun Crazy femme fatale Peggy Cummins in her American debut) presses George to join the modern world, but old WASPs don’t give up their stingers so easily. A gentle and effortless satire of middle age and evaporating aristocracy taken from Mr. Moto creator John P. Marquand’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1937 novel, the film adaptation benefits from screenwriter (and Harvard alum) Philip Dunne’s intimate familiarity with the milieu and director Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s singular skill in staging sophisticated dialogue. Together with Colman’s Oscar-winning turn in A Double Life released later the same year, The Late George Apley represents the culmination of the actor’s three-decade career. (KW)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
97 min • 20th Century-Fox • 35mm from Criterion Pictures, USA

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Spend Some Quality Time with the Extended Family:
Don Siegel’s The Lineup Returns in 35mm

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

18A_LineupMonday, July 22 @ 7:30pm
THE LINEUP
Directed by Don Siegel • 1958
Nominally a big-screen expansion of an undistinguished TV police procedural, The Lineup bristles with the genuine nastiness and unchecked sadism favored by screenwriter Stirling Silliphant and director Don Siegel. After its opening reel, The Lineup loses interest in the finer points of forensics and concentrates on the singularly sociopathic Dancer (Eli Wallach), a short-tempered hit man with no compunctions about threatening children or the disabled to reclaim a shipment of smuggled heroin. As a dumb working stiff who thrashes against a criminal hierarchy he can’t be bothered to understand, Wallach achieves a rare and uncomfortable intensity. Staging its mayhem on location at several now-vanished San Francisco landmarks, The Lineup’s irrational forward velocity finally and fittingly overflows the city itself: the climatic car chase takes place on an unfinished highway and it doesn’t disappoint.  (KW)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
86 min • Columbia Pictures • 35mm from Sony Pictures Repertory
Preceded by: Joe Besser in “Hook a Crook” (Jules White, 1955) – 35mm – 16 min

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The Lineup is one entertaining action picture, but our next feature might just save you soul.

18B-19A_Miracle ManWednesday, July 24 @ 7:30pm
THE MIRACLE MAN
Directed by Norman Z. McLeod • 1932
A whip-smart gang of New York grifters (Sylvia Sidney, Chester Morris, Ned Sparks, and John Wray) have one sweet swindle going until a fatal clash with lascivious landlord Boris Karloff ruins their plans. Fleeing the cops, Morris hides out in the seaside paradise of Meadville, California, home to a beloved faith healer known universally as the Patriarch (Hobart Bosworth). Sensing the potential for the scam of the century, Morris summons his confederates—but will they still accede to the scheme after the Patriarch makes the crippled walk again? Aside from being a gonzo gangster yarn and a memorable piece of white-hot entertainment in its own right, The Miracle Man holds great interest as a phantom artifact of film history: it’s a remake of an enormously popular 1919 film that has vanished but for a few fragments. The original version gave Lon Chaney a star-making turn as the double-jointed con man known as the Frog; if Chaney was anywhere near as impressive in that role as John Wray comes off in the 1932 rendition, we’ve lost something very special indeed. (KW)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
85 min • Paramount Pictures • 35mm from Universal

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Don Siegel’s The Lineup Returns in 35mm

Come Blow Your Horn: Richard Fleischer’s The Vikings Fights Its Way Back to the Screen in 35mm CinemaScope


17A_Vikings
Wednesday, July 17 @ 7:30pm at the Patio Theater, 6008 W. Irving Park Road
THE VIKINGS
Directed by Richard Fleischer • 1958
Mightiest Of Men . . . Mightiest Of Spectacles . . . Mightiest Of Motion Pictures! The second and final collaboration between Kirk Douglas and director Richard Fleischer (Walt Disney’s sublime 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea was the first) stars one-eyed Douglas and his half-brother Tony Curtis as Vikings competing for the recently captured Janet Leigh, both reporting to their totally unhinged father Ernest Borgnine. Shot in color and CinemaScope in Norway by the great Jack Cardiff (The Red Shoes, The African Queen), The Vikings is a whirlwind spectacle built for the big screen in the same class as The Ten Commandments and Around the World in 80 Days (though much shorter). The interiors are even better, including a drunken feast in the great hall (complete with an axe-throwing competition) that prompted the New York Times to call the film “the best advertisement for beer-drinking since the breweries put wrestling on TV.” Orson Welles narrates. (JA)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
116 min • Bavaria Film •  35mm from Park Circus
Preceded by: Selected Cartoon – 16mm – 7 min

——–

The cinema of 1958 was not entirely brutish and sadistic. But we are following The Vikings with one pretty nasty companion.

17B_LineupMonday, July 22 @ 7:30pm at the Patio Theater, 6008 W. Irving Park Road
THE LINEUP
Directed by Don Siegel • 1958
Nominally a big-screen expansion of an undistinguished TV police procedural, The Lineup bristles with the genuine nastiness and unchecked sadism favored by screenwriter Stirling Silliphant and director Don Siegel. After its opening reel, The Lineup loses interest in the finer points of forensics and concentrates on the singularly sociopathic Dancer (Eli Wallach), a short-tempered hit man with no compunctions about threatening children or the disabled to reclaim a shipment of smuggled heroin. As a dumb working stiff who thrashes against a criminal hierarchy he can’t be bothered to understand, Wallach achieves a rare and uncomfortable intensity. Staging its mayhem on location at several now-vanished San Francisco landmarks, The Lineup’s irrational forward velocity finally and fittingly overflows the city itself: the climatic car chase takes place on an unfinished highway and it doesn’t disappoint.  (KW)
[PURCHASE TICKETS] • [INVITE FACEBOOK FRIENDS]
86 min • Columbia Pictures • 35mm from Sony Pictures Repertory
Preceded by: Joe Besser in “Caught on the Bounce” (Jules White, 1952) – 35mm – 16 min

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It’s Patriotic! It’s Uplifting! It’s Industrial! It’s An American Romance in a 35mm Print from George Eastman House

Due to circumstances beyond our control, the Northwest Chicago Film Society will not be screening films at the Portage Theater. The rest of this season’s screenings have been moved to the Patio Theater.

15B_American RomanceWednesday, July 10 @ 7:30pm at the Patio Theater, 6008 W. Irving Park Road
AN AMERICAN ROMANCE
Directed by King Vidor • 1944
A leisurely American epic that devotes nearly as much screen time to the insides of automobile factories and steel mills as it does to its narrative, An American Romance stars Brian Donlevy as an ambitious Czech immigrant who works his way up from a lowly factory worker to a wealthy industrialist. Cut from the same cloth as hyper-enthusiastic, pro-American films like This Is the Army, An American Romance may as well have been an industrial film to boost morale at General Motors, and we mean that in the best possible way: lush Technicolor photography to show off American industry at its most thrilling, mixed with acting so sincere you’d think you were in a Coronet Films educational. Okay, Donlevy’s accent may be about as convincing as Boris Badenov in The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle, but it also tips the film over into the land of the surreal. Co-presented with portoluz – Old and New Dreams (JA)
121 min • MGM • 35mm from George Eastman House, permission Warner Bros.

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You don’t even want to know how giddily we’re looking forward to this one …

16B_Vikings
Wednesday, July 17 @ 7:30pm at the Patio Theater, 6008 W. Irving Park Road
THE VIKINGS
Directed by Richard Fleischer • 1958
Mightiest Of Men . . . Mightiest Of Spectacles . . . Mightiest Of Motion Pictures! The second and final collaboration between Kirk Douglas and director Richard Fleischer (Walt Disney’s sublime 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea was the first) stars one-eyed Douglas and his half-brother Tony Curtis as Vikings competing for the recently captured Janet Leigh, both reporting to their totally unhinged father Ernest Borgnine. Shot in color and CinemaScope in Norway by the great Jack Cardiff (The Red Shoes, The African Queen), The Vikings is a whirlwind spectacle built for the big screen in the same class as The Ten Commandments and Around the World in 80 Days (though much shorter). The interiors are even better, including a drunken feast in the great hall (complete with an axe-throwing competition) that prompted the New York Times to call the film “the best advertisement for beer-drinking since the breweries put wrestling on TV.” Orson Welles narrates. (JA) [PURCHASE TICKETS]
116 min • Bavaria Film •  35mm from Park Circus

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How Do You Say ‘Masterpiece’ in French? Otto Preminger’s Bonjour Tristesse in Restored 35mm CinemaScope!

Due to circumstances beyond our control, the Northwest Chicago Film Society will not be screening films at the Portage Theater. The rest of this season’s screenings have been moved to the Patio Theater. 

15A_Bonjour TristesseMonday, July 8 @ 8:00pm at the Patio Theater, 6008 W. Irving Park Rd.
BONJOUR TRISTESSE
Directed by Otto Preminger • 1958
Hoping to make amends to Iowa ingénue Jean Seberg after her critically reviled debut in Saint Joan, Otto Preminger cast her as the sullen Cecile in his adaptation of Françoise Sagan’s racy best-selling novel Bonjour Tristesse. A spoiled brat with a semi-incestuous fixation on her hard-drinking playboy father (David Niven, essentially continuing his performance from Preminger’s The Moon is Blue), Seberg plots to sabotage his grown-up affair with fashion designer Deborah Kerr. Teaming up with some of the key craftspeople of the classical French cinema (photographer Georges Périnal, composer Georges Auric), Preminger emerged with a bizarre and captivating hybrid: shot on location in color and CinemaScope on the French Riviera, Bonjour Tristesse credibly proposes the teenage soap opera as a form of high art. Screenwriter Arthur Laurents would attempt the same gambit three years later in his big-screen version of West Side Story, but no film comes close to Bonjour Tristesse in taking adolescent sexuality as the most consequential subject in the world. (KW)
94 min • Columbia Pictures • 35mm vault print from Sony Pictures Repertory

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What’s that? Too late for July 4th-style patriotism? We beg to differ…

16A_American RomanceWednesday, July 10 @ 7:30pm at the Patio Theater, 6008 W. Irving Park Rd.
AN AMERICAN ROMANCE
Directed by King Vidor • 1944
A leisurely American epic that devotes nearly as much screen time to the insides of automobile factories and steel mills as it does to its narrative, An American Romance stars Brian Donlevy as an ambitious Czech immigrant who works his way up from a lowly factory worker to a wealthy industrialist. Cut from the same cloth as hyper-enthusiastic, pro-American films like This Is the Army, An American Romance may as well have been an industrial film to boost morale at General Motors, and we mean that in the best possible way: lush Technicolor photography to show off American industry at its most thrilling, mixed with acting so sincere you’d think you were in a Coronet Films educational. Okay, Donlevy’s accent may be about as convincing as Boris Badenov in The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle, but it also tips the film over into the land of the surreal. (JA)
Co-presented with portoluz – Old and New Dreams
121 min • MGM • 35mm from George Eastman House, permission Warner Bros.

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